This Indicator seeks to assess each university’s level of Academic Commitment by measuring budget allocation levels to Instruction, to the Library, and to Total Academic Salaries. The fourth measure focuses on the share of Total Academic Salaries assigned to the most senior grade of faculty – those holding Academic Rank; this measure favours universities exhibiting a lower utilization of adjunct professors and sessional lecturers.

 

6 A) ACADEMIC COMMITMENT – EFFICIENCY RANKINGS

6A

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The Summary Rankings are derived from the detailed rankings in the first four of the tables below. Additional analyses are included but do not form part of the Summary Ranking.

6 B) ACADEMIC COMMITMENT – EXPENDITURE RANKINGS AND FINANCIAL IMPACT

These tables show the 2001 and latest spending levels, the latest expenditure, and the dollar impact of spending level variances (the amount by which the university is over-spending or under-spending, compared with past levels or current peer group levels).

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We have already addressed the allocation levels for Instruction & Non-Sponsored Research and for the Library in the Resource Allocation topic, but they are also relevant to this Indicator.

Additional insight is provided by the share of Total G.O. Salaries & Wages assigned to Total Academic Salaries. Across the Top 25, this has declined from 55.2% to 53.1%, but there is a surprisingly wide range – from 47.2% to 60.4%. Disconcertingly, more than three-quarters of the schools have reduced this allocation level since 2001 (Table 6.2).

One of the most controversial issues for students and for faculty is the degree to which the most senior grade of faculty (those holding academic rank) have been replaced, as a cost-saving exercise, with adjunct faculty and sessional lecturers. The Top 25 average has declined, but not significantly; however, the change has been more marked at some schools (Table 6.3).